Temperature controlled Food Transportation

The rule pertaining to transportation under the Food Safety Modernization Act – FSMA – is called the Sanitary Food Transportation Act – SFTA. Effective date is April 6 2017.

  • The final rule applies to shippers, receivers, loaders, and carriers who transport food in the United States by motor or rail vehicle, whether or not the food is offered for or enters interstate commerce. An entity is subject to the regulations in several ways – a shipper can also be a loader; a freight broker can be a shipper. Contractual shifting of responsibilities is allowed – be aware of what you’re signing.
    • Transportation regulations apply to:
      • Foods transported in bulk, e.g., juice, animal feed
      • Packaged foods not fully enclosed by a container, fresh produce
      • Foods that require temperature control for safety

      Key requirements:

      • Transportation operations must be conducted to prevent food from becoming unsafe during transport, including: assuring proper temperature controls; preventing contamination by contact with non-food items or raw food, or allergens. If a shipper, loader, broker, receiver, or carrier becomes aware of a possible material failure of temperature control or other condition that may render the food unsafe during transportation, the food shall not be sold or otherwise distributed. A shipper must develop and implement written procedures – which will then, of course, be contractually transferred to brokers and motor carriers – to assure vehicles and equipment are in appropriate sanitary condition; that previous cargo does not make food unsafe; that food requiring temperature control is transported under adequate temperature control (designation of required temps on the Load Sheet and proof of temperature control at delivery).While the enforcement and effective dates are still a year out, most if not all requirements will start to be enforced by shippers. I see a number of companies gearing up and using compliance as a selling point. You can expect to see language in contracts almost immediately.
      • Small reefer carriers are most likely the first affected. One or two losses in this new environment (of very conscious receivers) will hurt too much. Cargo insurance for reefer loads has too many unscrupulous exceptions to coverage. Freight brokers will see more claims for which they will be responsible – either by contract or contingent to the absence of underlying carrier coverage.
      • The burden will fall onto the motor carrier (and by extension, the broker) to prove – via USDA inspection – that the temperature deviation or other condition did not render the food unsafe.
      • Brokers will look more often to contingent cargo insurance
      • Carriers should buy better cargo coverage; brokers must monitor those policies.